stone fruit galette


stone fruit galette

This galette is a great way to use those end-of-summer juicy, ripened stone fruits, and a fitting treat for the final warm evenings of the summer.

 

ingredients:

2 batches of pastry dough

1/2 cup dark brown sugar

1/4 cup granulated sugar

juice of 1/2 a lemon

1/2 cup all-purpose flour

pinch of salt

about 4 cups of sliced peaches, plums, and nectarines (I used approximately 5 small peaches, 2 small plums, and 1 nectarine), pitted and sliced

1 egg

splash of milk or cream

sugar for sprinkling over the galette

 

First, prepare two batches of the pastry dough [separately] and transfer to the fridge to chill for at least an hour. While the dough chills, prepare the fruit: in a large bowl, combine both sugars, lemon juice, flour, and a pinch of salt. Add the slices of stone fruit and gently toss, making sure that each slice of fruit is completely covered with the sugar mixture. Cover and set aside in the fridge while you prepare the dough. 

Once the dough has chilled, preheat the oven to 400 degrees F. Line a half sheet pan with parchment paper. [It’s important that you use a half sheet pan with raised sides to catch any juices that may run during baking].

On a floured work surface, roll out both discs of dough in two large circles until about 1/8″ in thickness. Roll one circle of dough around the rolling pin, and unroll onto the lined sheet pan. Spoon the fruit mixture in the middle of the circle, leaving a 2-3 inch border around the edges.

Cut the second circle of dough into 1 1/2 – 2 inch strips. Weave the strips in a lattice pattern over the top of the fruit, spacing them about 1 inch apart. Trim the ends to leave a 2-inch inch border of the bottom layer of dough. Working around the galette, fold the bottom layer of dough up over the edge of the lattice and filling, making sure that the filling is completely enclosed in the crust.

In a small bowl, whisk together the egg and splash of milk or cream. Using a pastry brush, generously brush all exposed areas of the dough. Sprinkle sugar over top of the egg wash [I like to use a coarse sugar for texture, but plain granulated sugar would work as well].

Transfer to the oven and bake until the crust is golden and the fruit filling is thick and bubbling, about 50 minutes to 1 hour. Make sure to keep an eye on the crust — if it starts to look too brown, cover it loosely with aluminum foil for the remainder of the time in the oven.

Allow galette to rest for about 15 minutes before cutting it into wedges. Serve with big scoops of vanilla ice cream.

 

For the pastry dough:

2 cups unbleached all-purpose flour

1 teaspoon sugar

pinch of coarse salt

12 tablespoons cold, unsalted butter, cut into small cubes

1/2 cup ice water

In a medium bowl, combine the flour, sugar, and salt. Add the butter, and using your hands, work it into the flour until the mixture resembles coarse meal [there should be bits of butter visible throughout]. Add the water and mix until the dough just comes together. Flatten into a disc, wrap in plastic wrap, and chill in the refrigerator for at least an hour before using. Make two batches [separately] for this pie.

strawberry rhubarb + ginger galette

The first colors of the season have started to find their way to the farmers market. Greens and yellows mostly, but last Saturday, a tinge of red caught the corner of my eye. Following the red back to its source, I spotted a little table of rhubarb, hidden between a gathering of basil plants and a display of forsythia bouquets. The rhubarb was unmarked, just a humble pile of long, green stalks flecked with red at their roots. Amid a sea of people and activity, it stood untouched and seemingly unnoticed. I paused at the edge of the table, feeling as though I had found an undiscovered gem and excited at the prospect of what a bundle of these tart, crisp stalks would become.

It didn’t take long to decide what I would make, as strawberry rhubarb pie has always been one of my favorite Springtime desserts. The unassuming nature of this rhubarb, though, called for something a little more free form and less exacting than pie. A simple, rustic galette came to mind — the flavors of pie without the perfection.

I contemplated the filling as I put together the pastry dough — adding a handful of cornmeal for texture. I envisioned the tart sweetness of the strawberries and rhubarb, and found my imagination craving some brightness and heat. The brightness was easy — some lemon juice and zest would definitely do the trick — but adding heat without overshadowing such simple flavors had me a bit stumped. I rummaged through my pantry, exploring my collection of spices, but nothing seemed right. It wasn’t until a while later, hunched in front of my fridge, that I discovered a leftover nub of ginger root from a previous night’s dinner. I knew the second I spotted it — the sweet warmth of ginger made perfect sense.

Moments later a buttery, sweet aroma filled my apartment as I pulled a beautiful, bubbling galette from my oven. The strawberries and rhubarb had softened, creating a thick  jewel-red jam that peered from the center of a golden crust. A far cry from their unassuming pile on an unmarked table, but exactly where they belonged.


strawberry rhubarb + ginger galette

This galette combines the classic sweet and tart combination of strawberries and rhubarb, with a touch of fresh ginger root for a subtle, but delicious heat. A buttery cornmeal pie crust adds texture and richness. Simple, bright flavors and no fuss — just how a Spring dessert should be.

ingredients:

cornmeal pastry dough

2 cups sliced strawberries

3 stalks of rhubarb, ends trimmed and cut into 1/2-inch pieces [depending on size, should yield about 1 1/2 cups]

1 tablespoon lemon juice

1 teaspoon lemon zest

2 tablespoons minced fresh ginger root [this yields a very subtle warmth — if you’re looking for a more assertive heat, add more]

1/2 cup raw cane sugar

1/4 cup unbleached, all-purpose flour

pinch of salt

2 tablespoons unsalted butter, cut into small pieces

1 egg, beaten

vanilla ice cream, for serving

 

First, prepare the cornmeal pastry dough

. While the dough chills, prepare the filling:

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F.

In a large bowl, combine the sliced strawberries and chopped rhubarb. Add the lemon juice, lemon zest, ginger, sugar, flour, and salt. Mix to combine well. Allow to rest for about 10 minutes. 

Once pastry dough has chilled, on a floured surface, roll out into a large circle [about 15-inches in diameter]. Roll the dough onto your rolling pin and unroll onto a parchment or Silpat-lined large baking sheet. Add the filling to the center of the dough, leaving a 3-inch border. Working around the circle, carefully fold the border of the dough up over the edges of the filling, making sure to seal everything in, but leaving the majority of the filling exposed. 

Using a pastry brush, brush the exposed border of dough with the beaten egg. Dot the exposed filling with the pieces of butter. Transfer to the oven and bake until crust is golden and filling is bubbling, about 50 minutes. Allow to cool for 15 minutes before cutting into wedges. Serve warm with vanilla ice cream.

 

For the cornmeal pastry dough:

2 cups unbleached all-purpose flour

1/2 cup cornmeal

1 teaspoon sugar

1/2 teaspoon coarse salt

12 tablespoons cold, unsalted butter, cut into small cubes

1/2 cup ice water

In a medium bowl, combine the flour, cornmeal, sugar, and salt. Add the butter, and using your hands, work it into the flour until the mixture resembles coarse meal [the butter pieces should be able the size of peas]. Add the water and mix until the dough just comes together. Flatten into a disc, wrap in plastic wrap, and chill in the refrigerator for at least 30 minutes before using.

croissants and pain au chocolat

I hesitated sharing this post with you, as I realize how labor-intensive and unrealistic making croissants at home can be, especially considering the multitude of bakeries that offer high-quality, delicious pastries without any of the work. I also can’t take complete credit for this recipe, as I only slightly adapted it from The Faux Martha, who adapted it from Tartine. And, while this space was once more of a reflection of others’ recipes that I had tried and loved, it has since evolved into an almost exclusive journal of my own recipes  — hence my hesitation to share something I couldn’t truly take credit for. But, after making these croissants, tasting them, and feeling the profound sense of accomplishment in having created them, I couldn’t help but share the process with you.

So, if you ever find yourself at home over a weekend, without many plans, I hope you’ll think to visit this space and try your hand at making croissants. I promise you that biting into a buttery, flaky, warm croissant that YOU have created in your own kitchen, is reward enough for your efforts.


croissants and pain au chocolat

These pastries are the epitome of decadence and comfort. Buttery, flaky, and simply all around delicious. While they are labor-intensive and take almost a full weekend to make, the effort is completely worth it. This is not a process to rush — enjoy the slowness and exactness of it and you will be rewarded.

Slightly adapted from The Faux Martha’s recipe, which she adapted from Tartine.

 

ingredients

preferment

3/4 cup nonfat or lowfat milk

1 tablespoon instant yeast

1 1/3 cup unbleached all-purpose flour

dough

1 tablespoon + 1 teaspoon instant yeast

1 3/4 cup whole milk

5-6 cups unbleached all-purpose flour

1/3 cup granulated sugar

1 tablespoon + 1 teaspoon sea salt

1 tablespoon unsalted butter, melted

roll-in butter

2 3/4 cup (5 1/2 sticks) unsalted butter, cool but pliable

egg wash

4 large egg yolks

1/4 cup heavy cream

pinch of sea salt

 

instructions

Preferment: In a small sauce pan, heat milk until just warm [approximately 80-90 degrees]. Pour into medium bowl and add yeast. Stir until yeast is dissolved. Add flour and stir until a sticky dough forms. Cover with plastic wrap and allow to rise for 2-3 hours, or overnight in the refrigerator.

Dough: [Throughout these steps, try to work the dough as little as possible. An overworked dough will result in a tough croissant]. In a stand mixer with a dough hook, add the preferment mixture and 1 tablespoon + 1 teaspoon instant yeast to the bowl. Mix on low speed until evenly combined, about 1 minute, scraping down the sides if necessary. Increase speed to medium; while the mixer is running, gradually add half the milk and beat for 3 minutes. Reduce speed to low and add remaining milk, 5 cups of flour, sugar, salt, and melted butter. Mix until a shaggy dough forms, about 3 minutes. Allow dough to rest for 15 minutes.

After 15 minutes, set the mixer to low speed and add remaining flour 1/4 cup at a time until dough is smooth and elastic [not sticky or dry]. [You may not need to use all of the flour — I only used 1/4 cup additional]. If you find that your dough becomes too dry, you can add 1 tablespoon of milk at a time until you reach your desired consistency. Transfer dough to a glass bowl and cover with plastic wrap. Allow to rise in a cool place for 1 1/2 hours [dough should double in size].

After 1 1/2 hours, transfer dough to a lightly floured surface. Press into a rectangle, about 2 inches thick. Wrap lightly in plastic wrap and place in refrigerator. Allow to rest for an additional 4 hours.

Roll-in butter: About 3 hours into the dough’s resting period, prepare the butter. Add butter to a stand mixer fitted with a paddle attachment and beat on medium until malleable, about 3 minutes. Wrap butter in plastic wrap and shape into a square, about 1-inch thick. Transfer butter to fridge to chill, but not completely harden.

Laminating process: Remove dough and butter from fridge. Transfer dough to a lightly floured surface and roll out into a 28-inch x 12-inch rectangle. With the longest side of the rectangle closest to you, add the butter square to the left side of the rectangle. Spread butter over 2/3 of the rectangle, leaving the right-most 1/3 of the dough uncovered. Fold dough in thirds, like you would a letter: first folding the right, non-buttered portion over the middle, then the left, buttered portion over. Press the seams together to seal the butter in. This is called a plaque.

Turn the plaque so that the long edge is closest to you again. Roll out into a 28-inch x 12-inch rectangle. Fold dough in thirds again, and wrap lightly in plastic wrap. Return dough to fridge and allow to rest for 2 hours.

After 2 hours, remove dough from fridge and transfer to a lightly floured surface. Roll out dough into a 28-inch x 12-inch rectangle. Fold dough in thirds. The dough should measure 9-inches x 12-inches, and be about 2-inches thick, once folded. Wrap again in plastic wrap, but this time place in freezer to chill for 1 hour.

Assembly: Remove dough from freezer and transfer to a lightly floured surface. Roll our into a 32-inch x 12-inch rectangle, about 3/8-inch thick. [This is not the easiest step — just keep at it!] Using a sharp knife or a pastry wheel, cut long triangles, 4-inches wide at the base and the length of the short side of the rectangle, for croissants. For pain au chocolats, cut 6-inch x 4-inch rectangles.

Line a baking sheet with a Silpat, Silpain, or parchment paper. To shape the croissants, begin with the base of the triangle closest to you and tightly roll away from you, towards the point. Make sure the point sits under the croissant. [I found that it was easiest to stretch my triangles slightly before rolling, so that the croissants weren’t too squat]. To form pain au chocolats, add a chocolate baton or dark chocolate chips in a row along a short side of the rectangle. Beginning with the end with the chocolate, roll tightly away from you into a cylinder, making sure the seam is under the pastry. [Same with the croissants, I felt it was easier to slightly stretch the rectangles before stuffing and rolling. Make sure NOT to over stuff with chocolate, as it will ooze out during baking!]

Place pastries on the lined baking sheet, at least 2-inches apart on all sides. Cover lightly with plastic wrap and allow to rise in a warm, draft-free room for 2-3 hours, or until doubled in size. [At this point, you can retire the pastries to the fridge, and bake them off the next morning, or freeze them and bake them another time. Make sure to defrost frozen pastries on the counter, or in the fridge overnight, before baking].

Egg wash: In a small bowl, whisk together egg yolks, heavy cream, and salt until pale yellow.

Bake: Preheat the oven to 425 degrees F. Using a pastry brush, carefully paint the pastries with the egg wash, being sure to cover all sides. Once pastries are covered, make sure to wipe any drippings off the baking sheet. Allow the egg wash to dry slightly before baking.

Place pastries in oven and immediately turn heat down to 400 degrees F. Bake for 10-12 minutes. Rotate pan and continue to bake for another 10-12 minutes until golden. Remove from oven, and transfer pastries to a wire rack to cool slightly before serving. Make sure to eat warm!

Storage: Once cooled, keep pastries in an air-tight container at room temperature for up to one day. Or, store in an air-tight container in the refrigerator for up to one week. Reheat before serving in a 375 degree F oven for 7-8 minutes.

makes about 14 – 17 croissants